EHV Update 14.01.2020

Following the outbreak of EHV-1 infection at Crofton Manor Equestrian Centre, the practices and veterinary surgeons involved in the outbreak collectively discussed appropriate planning and continue to be in frequent contact ensuring collective awareness of the situation at Crofton and elsewhere. Inevitably situations such as this can generate misunderstandings and rumours so we thought it was worth issuing this collective post which outlines the approach agreed upon by practices looking after horses in the local area including Animed Equine VetsKings Bounty Equine PracticeThe Liphook Equine HospitalRiverside Vets Equine and Stable Close Equine Practice, in conjunction with Dr Richard Newton, Director of Epidemiology and Disease Surveillance at the Animal Health Trust.

We are considering horses to be in 1 of 3 levels of risk and should be treated accordingly:

A) Highest Risk – Horses stabled at Crofton Manor Equestrian Centre are subject to the strictest protocols with isolation, frequent clinical checks and also swabs and blood samples. This will be ongoing until they are found to no longer pose an infectious threat and normal activities can safely resume.

B) Intermediate Risk – Horses that have visited Crofton Manor Equestrian Centre at some time since 21st December 2019 along with their stablemates at their home yards. The horse or horses that visited Crofton should be kept isolated from others and also subject to clinical checks, swabs and blood samples. Movement of all other horses from the yard should also be restricted as they may have been exposed to the virus and may themselves act as a source of ongoing infection. As long as all remains well on these yards and test results are reassuring then we would expect movement restrictions to be no longer than 2 weeks since the date of the visit to Crofton. Where the two weeks since the date of the visit to Crofton has already elapsed, to be safe we still strongly advise clearance of animals that attended Crofton based on swab and blood testing.

C) Low Risk – Horses that have not visited Crofton or had contact with horses that have visited Crofton can continue to be managed as normal alongside increased vigilance of their health status (e.g. appetite, behaviour etc…).

Clearly advice could change in the future pending further developments and test results but so far we have had no evidence of EHV-related disease outside of Crofton.